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I would like to share this opportunity to all serious bloggers who want to monetize their blogs and they are tired of making few cents a day with their existing source of blogging income. Now that the importance of blogging has been accepted by  local Pakistani brand managers and they are more receptive to listen about advertising to blogs and spend their advertising budget.

This is the time to pick some hot local brands and start creating useful content which revolves around your targeted brand. Once your blog gets local traffic, try approaching directly to the brand managers and pitch your blog ad positions with a comprehensive tariff. Yeah, it requires a lot of work but believe me it can pay you off so well that you can’t even imagine at the moment.

If you think that getting money from local brands its not that easy mark my words “Local brand managers are searching for quality blogs where they can advertise”. So at least make “Advertise here” page in your blog and share the tariff online and start sending emails to your target brand managers. I hope this tip will work for you in making more money from your blog..

In the end, I would like to congratulate the Award winner Pakistani bloggers. Here is the list of winners

Karachi: A researcher in the Department of Computer Science, University of Karachi (KU) has developed a methodology to help accomodate the hearing-impaired in regular classes.

The methodology was developed under a project titled “Roshni” (light) in Information Technology and Artificial Intelligence by senior lecturer of the department, Syed Asif Ali, who has been engaged in research in this field for the last 12 years.

As per the methodology, special students will be now be able to attend classes with normal students in the same classroom.

Named the “Uniform Educational System by Information Technology,” the research project aims at using IT speech and vision matching on mathematical and statistical basis.

The project is in its phase of completion. This research has been published in ISI Index and proceedings of IEEE Conference 2010 in China.

It has also been marked as the important research work in the International Conference for Computers and in the Special Conference 2010, University of Vienna, Austria.

Given the fact that there was an absence of a comprehensive system which allowed special students and normal students to acquire education in the same classroom, KU Vice-Chancellor Prof. Dr Pirzada Qasim showed interest in the project, and the university allowed PhD level research on the topic.

Chairman Prof. Dr Aqil Burney has been overseeing the process from its initial phase, and has also supervised the research work.

With the implementation of this project, KU will become the pioneer of using latest technology for special students.

LAHORE : (Tuesday, June 29, 2010): Punjab University registration of private candidates who want to appear in BA/BSc Annual Examination 2011 is under process. The last date for registration with single fee (Rs 1600/-) is June 30, 2010 (today) while with double fee (if increased in July, otherwise Rs 3200/-) the last date is July 31, 2010. Candidates, who had passed Intermediate (FA/FSc) Annual Examination 2009 and before are eligible for registration while candidates passing Intermediate Exam in Supplementary Examination 2009, would have to attach attested photocopy of their failed result card of Annual Exam 2009. Registration forms can be obtained from Reception Centre of PU New Campus, University Sales Depot at Old Campus and nominated branches of Habib Bank on depositing Rs 15/-. The registration form can also be downloaded from university website: Click here to download.

The registration form, attested from gazetted officer, can be submitted along with testimonial photocopies of academic documents (including Matric & Intermediate), NIC, a photograph and original bank receipt of Rs 1600/-. Candidates having passed O or A level exam should attach Equivalence Certificates obtained from Inter Boards Chairman Committee (IBCC). He further said that the candidates must write down their own addresses on the form and not to mention the addresses of private colleges, academies or any friend/relative and all such forms would be rejected. Complete forms in every aspect can be submitted during office timings (8:00 am to 4:00 pm) in Registration Branch, Room No.25 Admin Block, Punjab University New Campus Lahore or sent through registered mail on the above-said address. No form receiving after due date (July 31) will be entertained. So this is in the good interest of the candidates that they get themselves registered before 31-07-2010.

In partial supersession of this Office Notification No. 179/A.C. dated 22nd June, 2010 regarding Date Sheet for the M.A./M.Sc Part-II Annual Examination 2010, it is hereby notified that the candidates of M.Sc. Psychology will take their written Examination in Paper XVII (Military Psychology) on 2nd August, 2010.

Time & Place for the paper will remain same as already notified.

In partial supersession of this Office Notification No. 179/A.C. dated 22nd June, 2010 regarding Date Sheet for the M.A./M.Sc Part-II Annual Examination 2010, it is hereby notified that the candidates of M.A. Economics will take their written Examination in Paper IX, Advanced Mathematical Economics (Old Course) on 2nd August, 2010.

Time & Place for the paper will remain same as already notified.

Lahore, The Punjab University (PU) declared the results of various examinations on Monday. These exams are: MS Gender Studies (Morning), Semester System, Session 2007-2009, MS Gender Studies (Self-Supporting), Semester System, Session 2007-2009, MPhil Communication Studies (Research Track), Semester System, Session 2008-2010, MA Women’s Studies (Self-Supporting), Semester System, Session 2002-2004, Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BS I.T), Fall 2005, Semester System, Session 2005-2009, BS Biochemistry (four-year), Semester System, Session 2000-2004, MSc Information Technology (Fall 2007), Semester System, Session 2007-2009, BSc (Hons) Space Science (four-year Programme), Semester System, Session 2005-2009 and Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, BS (CS), Semester System, Session 2005-2009.

D EMOCRACY has become a hackneyed term given the way in which it is being bandied about round the clock both at the global and national levels. Nowadays, however, this form of government has become cannon fodder for those resorting to political exploitation of the masses and world powers that want to usurp the resources of smaller nations, all in the name of “restoration of democracy”.

These acquired unwanted ramifications aside; no one can deny the indispensable utility of democracy. It is after all, democracy, which ensures flowering of a society’s hidden potential and talents.

Embodying alterations and changes necessitated by the onset of technology and the resulting institutions, democracy, first conceived at around 300 BC in ancient Greek city states such as Sparta, has come a long way. However, these changes have taken place within the given parameters with the overall structure remaining unchanged.

The changes may have been at a micro structural level but democracy at the macro structural level remains relatively unchanged since the past two millenniums, making it a time-tested system of governance.

However, like all going concerns, democracy, too, needs catalysts to keep it going. There are factors that have to fuel the engine of democracy in order to make it run. Democracy has certain prerequisites. Foremost among these is education, as only an educated mind possesses the magnanimity and intellect needed to grasp concepts such as liberty, equality, justice, law, rights and responsibilities of the state and its people.

As Jami Chandio, a research scholar and writer, explains that while it is true that there is a nexus between parliamentary government and learning, the democratic system in order to flourish needs a political and critical mass as the public sphere is its social constituency.

“In order to survive and thrive social equality needs politicallymotivated and committed citizens who have their stake in its survival and efficient functioning and they are the ones who sustain the system. Democracy, by and large, is more successful in those societies where the masses are politically conscious and aware of their rights as well as of their duties,” adds Chandio.

Yet, we have to acknowledge the fact that while education is an indispensable prerequisite, it has to be complemented by other factors. Two of the most important ones are tolerance and socio-economic equality. Both actually are corollaries to each other.

While it is true that perfect socio-economic equality is a utopian dream, minimum economic inequality is needed to ensure equal allocation of opportunity among different members of soci ety. Gaping disparity and denial of opportunity breeds unrest in society which takes the shape of class hatred, exploitation of the weak by the strong and class polarisation.

This, in turn, results in the usurpation of the rights of the less privileged, often completely disempowering them. Once we have the all-powerful haves and the totally disempowered have-nots, the former through sheer virtue of their power and pelf, ride roughshod over the latter. They deprive them of their rights as citizens, and of their due as citizens. This is a total antithesis to democracy.

Education and literacy, nonetheless, can help in strengthening and reinforcing democracy as they both harmonise and reinforce each other. Indeed, states with high literacy rates, such as Sweden, Luxembourg and Singapore, are making great strides in every walk of life. These nation states are gendersensitive and egalitarian societies and have been able to reduce the poverty level to make the lives of their citizens’ change for the better.

As a prominent post modern philosopher Michel Foucault argues that the education system and knowledge of a state determines course of action for its citizens. If the system is secular, egalitarian, forward looking, progressive, scientific and promotes logical thinking and reasoning, then the student body it produces would carry the same value system.

However, if the system promotes mediocrity, bigotry, rote learning, siege mentality and intolerance towards other religions and minorities, the results would be disastrous for the country and democratic institutions as the citizenry would be narrow-minded and fanatical, seeing the world through the cynical lens.

Unfortunately, the latter case is evident in our country. Regardless of possessing a functional democracy, our country lacks one of its fundamental char acteristic and thus, our republic is often considered superficial and a sham. To begin with, democracy intrinsically means equal opportunities for all its citizens irrespective of their class, gender, religion and ethnicity and this basic principle is openly flouted here. For all intent and purposes, our education system is class-based and discriminates against the students from the lower strata and marginalised groups. It is what Chandio calls “pattern client relationship”.

Our education system basically has three streams in accordance with students’ financial conditions and social class. The government schools cater to children from the lower middle class. They are starved of funds, facilities and infrastructure along with a curriculum that is obsolete, decadent and out of sync with the changing times. The same can be said about the madressah system where students from the most underprivileged section come as their parents are not able to provide them education or food and are happy to send them to institutions where the boarding and lodging is free.

Yet another stream of education is the elitist and very exclusive in nature private one. Its fee structure prevents admission of students from financially underprivileged backgrounds and only inducts students from the upper echelons of society. Explaining the phenomenon, Jami states: “Although the standard is very high and the students can compete internationally, they are not able to correspond with their society due to the limited exposure. Thus they are not able to think on the broader level and lack insight about the system. It develops a sense of alienation and isolationist thinking. And they are the ones who are most oblivious to the notions of democracy as they have no stake in it.” In states with high literacy rates, an education system is the first nursery for inculcating democratic values and tolerance. Instead, our education system re inforces a discourse whereby students learn prejudices, hatred for minorities and neighbouring states and above all internalise a sense of siege mentality through education.

Prof Jamal Naqvi, an eminent Marxist scholar and intellectual, elucidates: “Objective education needs knowledge and culture as it deals with the issues with sympathy and compassion and inculcates the same values in the students.” Conversely, hatred is sterile and you gain nothing from it. However, unlike other countries, Pakistan was formed on detestation and like other national institutions, our educational system is also based on the same rhetoric, adds Prof Naqvi.

In order to let democracy flourish and permeate in the minds of young students, it is crucial to make it a part of the curriculum from the very beginning, say, from the higher secondary level, across the board in all educational systems. And simultaneously more importance should be given to knowledge of culture.

Ahmed Salim, a Punjabi poet, writer and researcher, explicates: “Culture should be the focal point of schooling as it promotes tolerance, diversity and choices.” We as a nation are really short of these qualities, he adds.

In order to become a truly pluralistic and tolerant nation we should try to encourage democratic norms and culture at home, too. Then when the same values are taught at schools as an intrinsic part of the curricula, the effects would be manifold. In due course of time, the students would internalise its norms and values.

In a nutshell, we can encapsulate that education and democracy are congruent with each other, and by making our education system more democracy-friendly, we can help in establishing a more humane and literate society which could fight feudalism, religious fanaticism, social inequality and poverty, terrorism, and discrimination, (dawn.com)

PAKISTAN’S education crisis must be addressed by a drastic reform to renovate the system. However, any significant reform requires a thorough re search of the problems, evaluation of existing programmes, and long-term sustainability of successful approaches. To ensure progressive revisions in education, a constant supervision of changes as well as a vast array of information must be made available to stakeholders and policymakers.

Thus, organisations such as Centres of Education Policy and Development can play a pivotal role by gathering and researching data and serving as a national resource to both public and private educational institutions as well as provincial and federal governments. These centres of education can play a very important role in providing policymakers and all concerned stakeholders not only with the most up to date data and statistics but most importantly with skilled human resources capable of translating research findings into effective strategies.

Such centres can operate independently or perhaps even better as part of graduate education degree-awarding programmes in public universities such as the Sughra Begum Centre for Education Policy and Development (SuBCEPAD) at the Institute for Education Research, University of the Punjab, Lahore. Spread throughout the country in public or private higher education institutions, such centres of education policy development may take on a variety of issues and provide information and data at the local and national level to improve the speed of implementation and efficiency education policies.

The education system in Pakistan is failing its students and teachers. The poor quality of faculty, outdated curricula and a lack of resources have severely impaired the quality of graduate students and faculty. If education is to provide economic, social and technological advancement, there must be a significant investment to improve its quality and accessibility. In addition to financial support, effective educational reforms entail continuous research of and improvement in education policy and strategic plans. Thus, centres of educational research and policy are necessary tools to provide local and national policymakers with data that will assist them to choose the best approach for different issues.

The mission of education centres to promote high quality and accessible education can involve institutions, teachers, students and the public in meaningful ways in improving the current status of education. Graduate students and faculty from these centres can contribute to the mission by carrying out relevant research on issues that local schools, faculty, students and local government may have. They may make their results available to policymakers, and provide expert advice.

By working closely with educational institutions, faculty and policymakers in a community, the centres can provide a full perspective in their evaluation, expertise and services. The evaluation, planning and development provided by education centres can increase the capacity of the universities where they are located, by offering and awarding graduate degrees in related education research fields. At these centres, other degree or non-degree courses, workshops, symposia and training in the field of Education Policy Planning and Development may be offered to educators as well as the general public. Research and information resource The centres can provide information and information services supporting decision making, planning, and policy formation in a wide variety of areas. They may be able to offer a range of services that can strengthen the connections between different levels of educational institutions and facilitate student transition from one level to another. Closer assessment of each level can result in programmes tackling specific issues that can improve the academic success of students. The centres can collect information on various programmes of public agencies, private organisations, school districts and institutions of higher education and publish studies of successful programmes. This would include studying projects ranging from curriculum and test de sign, the development of feasibility models for tuition fees/enrollment, and the creation of funding models for accessible education.

The centres could also evaluate educational standards for faculty development and would make this information available to policymakers and education institutions as needed. Such extensive information may support not only specific departments or institutions and policy makers, but also help staff, students, parents and other researchers looking for information. They can profit from other report compilations, analysing regional and local data such as institution comparisons, enrollment figures, tuition and scholarships available, faculty salary and related studies. The centres must be equipped with the necessary capacity to respond to requests for information in timely and readily accessible ways. Analysing education trends The centres must be conducive to education research to develop and support initiatives to identify emerging policy issues, analyse educational policy issues, and make informed policy choices. As in other scientific fields, research in education involves rigorous rules to achieve full comprehension of the problems and suggest the best possible solution for them. It includes quantitative research where researchers collect data and analyse it using numerical procedures, using statistical analysis as well as qualitative approaches, gathering and analysing narrative data, such as case studies. Both methods are often combined to provide better results. Other approaches include basic and applied research and evaluation of data to make decisions of educational relevance. Training tomorrow’s leaders A major function of the education centres may be to prepare post-graduate students to assume a leadership role in the advancement of education in the country as future researchers and policymakers. By receiving academic and relevant hands-on training in the graduate programmes, students will be well-equipped to contribute to the solution of various educational problems.

They may gain valuable experience in research and development by getting involved in research work and publishing collaboratively with senior researchers. Their training must also include using innovative technology as a central part of their research and studying the application of technology to education. Education researchers increasingly employ video and electronic media to gather and store data on classroom activities and dialogue, student work and test results. In addition, web-based programmes can facilitate distribution of materials for learning purposes or dissemination of information reaching out to many institutions efficiently. Supporting faculty The quality of faculty determines the quality of an educational institution and thus the depth and breadth of student learning (“Need for a major faculty investment”, Dawn, January 24, 2010). The centres of education policy planning and development can offer great support to faculty both at individual and institutional level.

Centres can provide valuable information to teachers who wish to develop their skills in new methods of pedagogy and learning, developing curricula and advancing their own training. For students who wish to pursue a career in teaching, other reports on subjects such as salary ranges, tenure programmes and certification programmes for teachers can be very useful. Online teaching and instruction can also aide those teachers wishing to supplement their knowledge. At the institutional level, the centres may research issues related to faculty development, motivation and compensation and can suggest action plans such as policy reforms or pilot programmes that can improve the quality of faculty and increase their motivation. Interdisciplinary collaboration The world we live in is increasingly interdependent. Innovations in technology encourage growth in unexpected ways, making interdisciplinary collaboration inevitable. Thus the centres of education policy development can combine unique opportunities with the talents of scholars from many disciplines to find innovative solutions on problems of learning, teaching, assessment, and policy. Researchers of various areas of specialisation can work together collaboratively to find new ways of responding to problems, such as involving new technology, creating new programmes of study, or delivering education in non-traditional ways. Academic and research collaboration is beneficial to the faculty, i.e., in learning new teaching tools, and to the students in increasing the breadth of their knowledge (“Benefits of academic and research collaboration”, Dawn, December 6, 2009). Facilitating dialogue and debate The centres of education policy development can play an important role in engaging the public in open discussions and debates giving a chance to all stakeholders to voice their concerns and suggestions. The centres can thus become engines of progressive changes by receiving new ideas, translating them to feasible policies and making them available to policy makers. The centres can also be used by the policy makers to reach the public and effectively disperse information on new programmes by, for example, offering seminars or guidance and explanations on these programmes. Through meetings and publications, the centres can make such information available to the public, to civic, business, and higher education leaders. Thus, the centres can facilitate community and business leaders’ involvement in promoting education reform and enable them to provide direct financial support to education projects.

A better future for the education system starts with sound research and development. ¦ The writers work for the Promotion of Education in Pakistan Foundation, Inc., USA info@pepfoundation.org

p akistan’s education crisis must be addressed by a drastic reform to reno- vate the system. however, any signifi- cant reform requires a thorough re- search of the problems, evaluation of existing programmes, and long-term sustainability of suc- cessful approaches. to ensure progressive revi- sions in education, a constant supervision of changes as well as a vast array of information must be made available to stakeholders and poli- cymakers. thus, organisations such as centres of education policy and development can play a pivotal role by gathering and researching data and serving as a national resource to both public and private educational institutions as well as provincial and federal governments. these cen- tres of education can play a very important role in providing policymakers and all concerned stakeholders not only with the most up to date data and statistics but most importantly with skilled human resources capable of translating research findings into effective strategies. such centres can operate independently or perhaps even better as part of graduate educa- tion degree-awarding programmes in public uni- versities such as the sughra begum centre for education policy and development (subcepad) at the institute for education research, university of the punjab, lahore. spread throughout the country in public or pri- vate higher education institutions, such centres of education policy development may take on a variety of issues and provide information and da- ta at the local and national level to improve the speed of implementation and efficiency educa- tion policies. the education system in pakistan is failing its students and teachers. the poor quality of facul- ty, outdated curricula and a lack of resources have severely impaired the quality of graduate students and faculty. if education is to provide economic, social and technological advancement, there must be a significant investment to im- prove its quality and accessibility. in addition to financial support, effective educational reforms entail continuous research of and improvement in education policy and strategic plans. thus, centres of educational research and policy are necessary tools to provide local and national pol- icymakers with data that will assist them to choose the best approach for different issues. the mission of education centres to promote high quality and accessible education can in- volve institutions, teachers, students and the public in meaningful ways in improving the cur- rent status of education. graduate students and faculty from these centres can contribute to the mission by carrying out relevant research on is- sues that local schools, faculty, students and lo- cal government may have. they may make their results available to policymakers, and provide expert advice. by working closely with educational institu- tions, faculty and policymakers in a community, the centres can provide a full perspective in their evaluation, expertise and services. the evaluation, planning and development provided by education centres can increase the capacity of the universities where they are located, by offer- ing and awarding graduate degrees in related ed- ucation research fields. at these centres, other degree or non-degree courses, workshops, sym- posia and training in the field of education policy planning and development may be of- fered to educators as well as the general public. research and information resource the centres can provide information and infor- mation services supporting decision making, planning, and policy formation in a wide variety of areas. they may be able to offer a range of services that can strengthen the connections be- tween different levels of educational institutions and facilitate student transition from one level to another. closer assessment of each level can result in programmes tackling specific issues that can improve the academic success of stu- dents. the centres can collect information on various programmes of public agencies, private organisations, school districts and institutions of higher education and publish studies of success- ful programmes. this would include studying projects ranging from curriculum and test de- sign, the development of feasibility models for tuition fees/enrollment, and the creation of fund- ing models for accessible education. the centres could also evaluate educational standards for faculty development and would make this information available to policymakers and education institutions as needed. such ex- tensive information may support not only specif- ic departments or institutions and policy makers, but also help staff, students, parents and other researchers looking for information. they can profit from other report compilations, analysing regional and local data such as institution com- parisons, enrollment figures, tuition and scholar- ships available, faculty salary and related stud- ies. the centres must be equipped with the nec- essary capacity to respond to requests for infor- mation in timely and readily accessible ways. analysing education trends the centres must be conducive to education research to develop and support initiatives to identify emerging policy issues, analyse educa- tional policy issues, and make informed policy choices. as in other scientific fields, research in education involves rigorous rules to achieve full comprehension of the problems and suggest the best possible solution for them. it includes quan- titative research where researchers collect data and analyse it using numerical procedures, using statistical analysis as well as qualitative ap- proaches, gathering and analysing narrative da- ta, such as case studies. both methods are often combined to provide better results. other ap- proaches include basic and applied research and evaluation of data to make decisions of educa- tional relevance. training tomorrow’s leaders a major function of the education centres may be to prepare post-graduate students to assume a leadership role in the advancement of education in the country as future researchers and policy- makers. by receiving academic and relevant hands-on training in the graduate programmes, students will be well-equipped to contribute to the solution of various educational problems. they may gain valuable experience in research and development by getting involved in research work and publishing collaboratively with senior researchers. their training must also include us- ing innovative technology as a central part of their research and studying the application of technology to education. education researchers increasingly employ video and electronic media to gather and store data on classroom activities and dialogue, student work and test results. in addition, web-based programmes can facilitate distribution of materials for learning purposes or dissemination of information reaching out to many institutions efficiently. supporting faculty the quality of faculty determines the quali- ty of an educational institution and thus the depth and breadth of student learning (“need for a major faculty investment”, dawn, january 24, 2010). the centres of education policy planning and development can offer great support to faculty both at individual and institutional level. centres can provide valuable information to teachers who wish to develop their skills in new methods of pedagogy and learning, developing curricula and advancing their own training. for students who wish to pursue a career in teach- ing, other reports on subjects such as salary ranges, tenure programmes and certification pro- grammes for teachers can be very useful. online teaching and instruction can also aide those teachers wishing to supplement their knowledge. at the institutional level, the centres may re- search issues related to faculty development, motivation and compensation and can suggest action plans such as policy reforms or pilot pro- grammes that can improve the quality of faculty and increase their motivation. interdisciplinary collaboration the world we live in is increasingly interde- pendent. innovations in technology encourage growth in unexpected ways, makin

g interdiscipli- nary collaboration inevitable. thus the centres of education policy development can combine unique opportunities with the talents of scholars from many disciplines to find innovative solu- tions on problems of learning, teaching, assess- ment, and policy. researchers of various areas of specialisation can work together collaboratively to find new ways of responding to problems, such as involving new technology, creating new pro- grammes of study, or delivering education in non-traditional ways. academic and research col- laboration is beneficial to the faculty, i.e., in learning new teaching tools, and to the students in increasing the breadth of their knowledge (“benefits of academic and research collabora- tion”, dawn, december 6, 2009). facilitating dialogue and debate the centres of education policy development can play an important role in engaging the pub- lic in open discussions and debates giving a chance to all stakeholders to voice their concerns and suggestions. the centres can thus become engines of progressive changes by receiving new ideas, translating them to feasible policies and making them available to policy makers. the centres can also be used by the policy makers to reach the public and effectively disperse infor- mation on new programmes by, for example, of- fering seminars or guidance and explanations on these programmes. through meetings and publi- cations, the centres can make such information available to the public, to civic, business, and higher education leaders. thus, the centres can facilitate community and business leaders’ in- volvement in promoting education reform and enable them to provide direct financial support to education projects. a better future for the education system starts with sound research and development. ¦ the writers work for the promotion of education in pakistan foundation, inc., usa info@pepfoundation.org (dawn.com)

Girls clinch top positions in SSC (general) exams
Karachi, July 01: Girl students outclassed boys in the Secondary School Certificate, Part-II (Regular and Private) general group annual examinations-2010 as they bagged all the first three positions.

The results declared on Wednesday by the Board of Secondary Education Karachi (BSEK) showed the overall pass percentage of all candidates (both regular and private) stands at 62.60, which is almost same as that of the last year’s examination of the same group (62.23 per cent).

Tooba Wasim (Roll No 636631), daughter of Mohammad Waseem Khan, a student of Mama Parsi Girls School, topped the examination by securing 758 marks out of 850 (89.18 per cent).

The second position was shared by Noor-ul-Ain (Roll No 630083), d/o Usman Ghani, a student of Nasra Secondary School No.2, and Asma (Roll No 636307), d/o Altaf, a student of KMA Girls Secondary School, Nawab Mahabat Khanji Road. Both of them got 750 marks (88.24pc).

Mehreen Salim (Roll No 628772), d/o Mohammad Saleem, a student of DMS Girls Higher Secondary School stood third in the examination by obtaining 749 marks (88.12pc).

Statistics of the results showed that in all 29,953 candidates – 23,862 regular and 6,091 private – appeared in examination and of them, 18,751 (15,040 regular and 3,711 private) were declared successful in the exams in different grades.The pass percentage of regular and private candidates stood at 63.03 and 60.93, respectively.

According to the statistics, among the successful regular candidates, 1,358 got ‘A’ grade; 3,560 secured ‘B’ grade; 5,958 obtained ‘C’ grade; 3,705 got ‘D’ grade and 248 were placed in E grade. Among the private candidates, 228 secured ‘A’ grade; 846 got ‘B’ grade; 1,341 obtained ‘C’ grade; 923 got ‘D’ grade while 62 were declared passed in ‘E’ grade. Dawn

July: School-AGE children are full of energy making it an uphill task for their parents, especially the mothers, to keep them occupied and away from mischief. While ordinary tricks may work during routine tracks, school holidays make for a long stretch of time that requires special planning. Apart from the time taken up by fun activities, weekend picnics, sojourns and other amusement-filled events, there is still a lot of time remaining which needs to be utilised creatively and usefully. There are a few options that are worth trying out in this respect. Some children like to sketch, draw or paint. Others may like to sing, dance, act or even mimick. Yet others would cherish reading, writing or storytelling. It is always very productive to identify the interests that a child possesses and refine them to a higher degree.

The holidays make a near ideal stretch to consciously acknowledge such talents and evolve a premise to develop them in a befitting manner. It may be remembered that there is no magic formula of universal application in existence that will treat all as one. The best way is to apply a combination of means and pick on those that seem to click.

For independent-minded children, it is appropriate to discuss ideas along with the possible ways of realising them. Often inspirational modes and motivational techniques seem to work well. For instance, a child with interest in art and painting can be shown the various works of arts displayed in the galleries, museum and similar venues. Pre-planned visits with a few instructions can be very fruitful. Children can be encouraged to record their observations by sketching from memory. They can also draw subjects as to their liking.

If the talent is ripe and has also acquired a mature status, an interface with an artist or a visit to an art school can prove to be a bountiful experience. Young folks can be driven to set some approximate targets to be achieved during their vacations.

In some cases, the parents will have to take the initiative to help streamline the activities for their children according to their interests. For example, those budding talents interested in performing arts may be encouraged to prepare and perform part plays, skits or lines from classical texts. With familiar audience and surroundings, the children shall be able to overcome shyness and intonation problems of speech.

Step by step improvement may be observed and lauded. The parents may seek expert advice once they feel that the child is ready for it. With the vast audio-visual resources freely accessible through the internet, the task can become all the more exciting to follow.

Few older children display inklings of entrepreneurship of various kinds. It is a rare but worth fostering ability. An entrepreneur is an individual who has an idea and also knows how to implement it. Normally this attribute is linked up with business and commerce. But we also come across accomplished social and philanthropic entrepreneurs. A child may have a genuine zeal to help out his less-privileged classmates or friends in an innovative way.

The first step could be to understand the band of thoughts that the child is able to sound about any imaginary project. Thereafter, he may be given tips and hints to develop it further. If rational, the child may be encouraged to pilot it as a demonstration work. It will boost his confidence to no end.

Grooming a raw but visible talent and nurturing it into a skill is a deed that inculcates enormous confidence. Self-realisation in a young mind to be able to master a skill and display the same with command becomes a lifelong asset in personality development. And very basic input and support by parents and peers can lead to that high achievement. -By Dr Noman Ahmed (The writer is professor and chairman, Department of Architecture and Planning, NED University, Karachi) Dawn